The pyramid at The Louvre Museum in Paris.

The pyramid at The Louvre Museum in Paris.

A History of the Comic Strip exhibition opens at The Louvre Museum in Paris.

Date(s)
1967 - 2009
"The rewards are great, but without the burden of conscience resulting from having done someone in. If you win, it is because you have parlayed the hours spent in the attic by finding a world full of prototypes of yourself who keep you in gilded slavery of feeding their habit" (Caniff, 3).
The preface to the text A History of the Comic Strip introduced the comic book art exhibit housed at The Louvre Museum in 1967. It invokes the lonely hours an artist spends doodling and the wild imaginings of the reader, while also introducing some of the commonalities underlying human consciousness. Prototypes and archetypes have helped us to imagine ourselves in relation to others and the universe. The abstract nature of the simplified comic combines text and fixed image media to tell widely relatable stories. These stories invoke the creative imaginings of the collective unconscious, while adding to the storysphere of speculative fiction. 

Originally written and exhibited in French, Eileen B. Hennessy translated A History of Comics into English in 1968, making it available to the American reader. The Louvre's exhibit set a precedent, allowing the academic community to examine comics as serious literature. In 2009, The Louvre renewed its interest in the comic arts with an exhibition entitled "The Louvre invites the comics." From January 22, 2009 to April 13, 2009 it highlighted a wide assortment of graphic styles and artists.
Sources
A History of the Comic Strip. Eileen B. Hennessy, trans. New York: Crown Publishers, Inc., 1968.

Caniff, Milton. "Preface." A History of the Comic Strip. New York: Crown Publishers, Inc., 1968.

The Louvre Invites the Comic. Louvre.fr/en. Fabrice Douar, Deputy Director, Department of Publications, Musée du Louvre, and Sébastien Gnaedig, Editorial Director, Futuropolis. Scenography by M.-A. Mathieu.
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