Two men pose while holding a brutalized man

Two men pose while holding a brutalized man

Detroit Race Riots of 1943

Date(s)
June 20, 1943
During World War II, there was large influx of black migrants from the South taking jobs in defense plants, which in turn caused a housing shortage and intense competition for jobs between Black Americans and whites in the North. This racial tension eventually resulted in the Detroit Race Riot – starting on June 20th and ending June 23rd. 25 Black Americans were killed, largely by the police, over 85% of the 1,800 people arrested were black, and 75% of the 700+ people injured were black. There was an estimated $27.5 million dollars worth of property damage, mostly black property and everyone charged with offenses were black. This event was highly photographed and thus globally sensationalized. Since most photos depicted white mobs violently attacking black men or destroying property, there was widespread controversy as well. The visibility of the event led to mass criticism of whites at the time and also President Roosevelt. It had become increasingly evident that public media and photography needed to be controlled for social order (Baulch and Zacharias 2000).
Sources
"Anti Negro Race Riot In Detroit." The Rucker Archive. Accessed December 11, 2015. http://theruckerarchive.com/projects/anti-negro-race-riot-in-detroit/.
Baulch, Vivian M., and Patricia Zacharias. "The 1943 Detroit Race Riots." Rearview Mirror. The Detroit News, 2000. Web. 01 Dec. 2015. https://www.mtholyoke.edu/courses/rschwart/clio/detroit_riot/DetroitNewsRiots1943.htm.
Chandler, D. L. "Detroit Race Riots Began On This Day In 1943." Newsone. June 20, 2013. Accessed December 11, 2015. http://newsone.com/2605677/detroit-race-riot-1943/.
Dean, Royal. "Detroit Race Riot 1943." Detroit Race Riot 1943. 2012. Accessed December 11, 2015. http://www.detroits-great-rebellion.com/Detroit---1943.html#.
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