ReachingOut.jpg

American Forces Deployed to Vietnam

Date(s)
July 28, 1965

In order to maintain a non-Communist South Vietnam, America had provided economic and administrative support to the South Vietnamese until President Lyndon B. Johnson announced the deployment of 125,000 American troops on July 28, 1965 (Manning and Wyatt 2011 Vol. II 2011). Official American military involvement led to larger media and press coverage of the ongoing conflict. The Vietnam War led to some of the most iconic war images taken by photographers like Nick Ut, Malcolme Browne, Horst Faas, and Larry Burrows. Their pictures depicted the horrors of war in a lasting way, which had influence over the American public (Struk 2011).

Sources

Encyclopedia of Media and Wartime Propaganda in Wartime America. Vol. II. Ed. Martin J. Manning and Clarence R. Wyatt. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, LLC, 2011. Print.

Struk, Janina. Private Pictures: Soldiers’ Inside View of War. London: I.B. Tauris, 2011.

Photographs:
Adams, Eddie. "Saigon Execution." The New York Times. Accessed December 15, 2015, http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/18/eddie-adams-ten-years-on-and-war-will-never-be-the-same/?_r=0.

Browne, Malcolm. "Self-Immolation of a Buddhist Monk." Rare Historical Photos. Accessed December 15, 2015, http://rarehistoricalphotos.com/the-burning-monk-1963/

Burrows, Larry. "Reaching Out." Time.com. Accessed December 15, 2015, http://time.com/3491033/life-behind-the-picture-larry-burrows-reaching-out-vietnam-1966/.

Faas, Horst. "War is Hell." Rare Historical Photos. Accessed December 15, 2015, http://rarehistoricalphotos.com/soldier-war-is-hell-vietnam-1965/.

Ut, Nick. "The Terror of War." Curiator.com. Accessed December 15, 2015, http://curiator.com/art/nick-ut.

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