Rodney King post-beating and arrest

Rodney King post-beating and arrest

Rodney King Arrest

Date(s)
March 3, 1991
Rodney King, a Black American motorist, is pursued for speeding, and after a brief chase, three white LAPD officers beat King as 17 officers watch. Unknown to the officers, George Holliday, an amateur cameraman, videotapes the event and sells it to a local television station (Solomon 2004). Soon after, this videotape is broadcasted thousands of times and results in public outrage over racism and police brutality. The court breaks down the video, by pausing, cutting, and churning out clips; this process became referred to as “framing” (Gerrie 2006). In April 1992, with the return of not-guilty verdicts for the four police officers who had been indicted for the beating of King, there is a revival of mass outcry (Solomon 2004).
Sources
Cannon, Lou. "The Limits of Videotape: An Echo of Rodney King." RealClearPolitics. December 8, 2014. Accessed December 10, 2015. http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2014/12/08/the_limits_of_videotape_an_echo_of_rodney_king_124878.html.
Gerrie, Ian. 2006. “Knowledge on the Horizon: A Phenomenological Inquiry into the "framing" of Rodney King”. Human Studies 29 (3). Springer: 295–315. http://www.jstor.org/stable/27642755.
Gonzalez, J. "George Holliday, the Man with the Camera Who Shot Rodney King While Police Beat Him, Got Burned, Too." NY Daily News. June 20, 2012. Accessed December 10, 2015. http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/george-holliday-man-camera-shot-rodney-king-police-beat-burned-article-1.1098931.
Solomon, William L., and William S. Solomon. 2004. “Images of Rebellion: News Coverage of Rodney King”. Race, Gender & Class11 (1). Jean Ait Belkhir, Race, Gender & Class Journal: 23–38. http://www.jstor.org/stable/41675111.
Files